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Correspondence

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Type: Text | Text
Creator: Coker, Francis Marion, 1827-1905
Title: Correspondence
Date: 1863 Jan.-1863 Aug. 7
Description: Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Camp Pinewood, VA.), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], January 3, 1863. He was not injured in the battle but was near the place where Tom Cobb was killed [General T. R. R. Cobb] He wishes he could see little India and hear her try to talk. Rumors of a victory for Bragg in the West. -- Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Albany), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], January 5, 1863. He has evidently been home--he speaks of thinkgs he forgot. Very short note. -- Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Camp Pinewood), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], January 8, 1863. His trunk came, but all his food had been stolen. However, he is not hungry--they have a little cabbage and some turnips. -- Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], February 22, 1863. [somehow between the letter above (68) and this one, he got to South Carolina and is now back in Virginia. I think he had a furlough] Says his last letter written in Kingsville S. C. where they had to lie over. They are travelling by train and he had several accidents. Got to Petersburg where he went to the Theatre. Show was poor, there were several fights among the audience. Snowing-- a foot deep. -- Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], February 26, 1863. Still cold. Snow deep. Roads impassable, operations suspended. Caught his first louse on himself today, [he has been home, he refers to it] He has a bad cold and fever. The boys are having snow battles. -- Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Pinewood), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], February 28, 1863. The children have measels. Weather very wet, water in his tent. Jackson's and part of Longstreet's corps. are still around Fredericksburg. -- Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Pinewood), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], March 3, 1863. A love letter. -- Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Pinewood), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], March 9, 1863. Personal. It is her 27th birthday. He has "no birthday present" for her except his heart, love and devotion. -- Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Camp Pinewood), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], March 11, 1863. Snowing again. He sends her some writing paper and some shoe polish and a newspaper. If the roads would get dry they could go over and whip "fighting Joe Hooker" out of his boots!. Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp Pinewood, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], March 18, 1863. Troops have moved up to Fredericksburg, "fighting Joe Hooker " thinks he can wipe out Robert E. Lee, Esq. -- Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp Pinewood, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], March 19, 1863. Were sent back to camp. Not needed yet. Threatened with a Calvary Raid. Snowing again. They get bread, bacon, and some sugar, out of which they make syrup. Don't send a big box of food--you'll probally need it worse there. Six inches of snow, major Pelham killed. Suggests she wean the baby, since she is 18 months old. -- Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp Pinewood, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], March 21, 1863. "Subsitutes and discharges seem to be the order of the day, while patriotism is dissolving into thin air." Snowed heavily and now is raining. Boys catch snow birds, call them "confederate gobblers". -- Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], March 27, 1863. Discussion of prices. Tells her to take care of her crockery and knives and forks for no more is to be had for less than a fortune. Expects another campaign as soon as warm weather comes. -- Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp Pinewood, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], March 29, 1863. Discussion of sustitutes and people who don't fight. He hears small pox is in Americus she must not leave the yard nor let the children play with anyone. If they get it wire him at once. The army is preparing to move. May go to Maryland. -- Letter from: Sallie (wife) [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], Americus, to: F. M. C[oker], April 1, 1863. It has been a year since he left to go to war and except for his one month's furlough she has not seen him. She misses him, she wishes he would get a substitute, etc. -- Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Camp Pinewood), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], April 1, 1863. A year ago he left her for war--he is depressed--philosophizes on the futility and horror of war. Wonders if he will ever see her again. Sees no hope for peace. Army hasn't moved yet, due to bad weather. -- Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp Pinewood, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], April 6, 1863. Answers questions in her letters just received. He is tolerable comfortable, at least his tent is dry. He flatly refuses to hire a substitute. "I would sacrifice anything but honour and principle to be with you." [letter unsigned] continued in next]. Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], April 7, 1863. Failed to get letter off, so adds more. They haven't much food, as rations have been cut. Tells her to take care of her provisions. Letter paper is $4 or $5 a quire now. Weather and roads still bad. The Army seems to be getting ready to move as soon as roads dry out. Adds a P. S. to say that a friend tried to buy his wife a bonnet in Richmond and they cost $100 to $150. -- Letter from: J. W. Furlow, (Americus), to: F. M. C[oker], April 8, 1863. Statement of moneys collected for Mr. Coker. Investments, business letter. He considers the outlook very gloomy. -- Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], April 9, 1863. As war continues, things will get worse. Don't send any more clothes. He has finally got a horse. Expecting to move to Fredericksburg in two or three days. With a battle to follow, he believes. -- Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Camp Pinewood), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], April 22, 1863. Weather warmer, he is sending home some winter bedclothes. Says he's had some yeast which he apparently never saw before. Makes elegant bread with only flour and water! things look brighter to him now. Batallion news. -- Letter from: W. B. C. Coker (Thunder Bolt Battery), to: Brother, April 24, 1863. Yankees making strong demonstrations on coast near Charleston. News of their location. Possible they may go to Tennessee. Diatribe against Yankees burning and destroying. Business and money matters. -- Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Camp Pinewood VA), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], April 25, 1863. Don't send food--keep what you have, you will need it later. Salt is about $50 a sack. He fears, from her letter, that Woodson is dead. War news in the West is bad. -- Letter from: Thomas D. Speer, (Sumter County GA), to: F. M. C[oker], April 27, 1863. Business letter--considers land a better investment than Negroes or bonds. Urges him to get a substitute and come home to attend to his business--one can be hired for $3,000 to $5,000. -- Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Camp Pinewood), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], April 29, 1863. Ready to move into battle, tells her where he has left his trunk in case anything happens to him. -- Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Camp near Fredericksburg), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], May 8, 1863. Battle is over, describes destruction of Hookers' Hqs. at Chancellorsville. Yankees had to abandon all, so Confederates now are "rigged out" with new clothes, supplies and guns. -- Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Fredericksburg Heights), to: Furlow, May 13, 1863. Encloses list of notes he has bought with instructions to Furlow about handling them. Mentions war, especially death of General Jackson. -- Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Fredericksburg Heights), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], May 19, 1863. A Major Lave put in command of Battn. but he commands respect of no one, thus F. M. C. fears he must dissolve connection with him and to do this must leave the Battn. Trying to get a transfer, for health reasons, also. -- Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Fredericksburg Heights, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], May 29, 1863. Brother Jackson dead [typhoid fever]. Died in hospital in Richmond, and letter deals with this. -- Letter from: W. B. C. C., (Thunder Bolt Battery), to: F. M. C[oker], May 29, 1863. Business letter. Letter from: John Coker, (Camp Thunder Bolt Battery near Savannah), to: F. M. C. (brother) [F. M. Coker], May 30, 1863. A business letter. Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Fredericksburg Heights, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], May 31, 1863. Rumor Grant fell back at Vicksburg. Hasn't heard of transfer and if he doesn't he will make an effort to resign. Battn. may be turned into calvary. Expects another conflict soon. -- Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Fredericksburg Heights, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 2, 1863. Hopes a transfer will go through--no news yet. Is depressed over the war--says the South resources are failing rapidly. His health is poor--he feels only contempt for his "Boss" News has just come that the Battn. is to be attached to A. P. Hills' Corps. -- Letter from: John m. Coker, (Camp Thunderbolt Battery, Savannah, Ga.), to: F. M. C[oker], June 4, 1863. A business letter. -- Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (camp near Fredericksburg), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 8, 1863. He has been sick but is better. Tells of friends in Battn. who are sick. He hears the Yankees have fallen back to cover Washington. Describes the three Army Corps. Longstreets' Ewells' and Hills'. Has no hopes of transfer. -- Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp near Fredericksburg, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 9, 1863. A short note. No news of the transfer. No fight yet. -- Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp near Fredericksburg, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 11, 1863. Health is improving and no news of transfer. Army has been in line of battle six days, sleeping in field. -- Letter from: S. C. (wife) [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], (Americus, GA), to: F. M. C[oker], June 13, 1863. She's worried about him--his health--suggests cayenne pepper dissolved in water as a remedy. -- Letter from: J. M. Coker, (Camp Thunderbolt Battery, Savannah, Ga), to: F. M. C[oker], June 14, 1863. Money and who owes who for whiskey, etc. Business letter. -- Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (near Camp Fredericksburg), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 14, 1863. No news. Many things in his present position "mortify and wound" him. Wishes he could be with her at the commencement exercises. Bishop Pierce is to preach she says. Army will probally move in a day or two. -- Letter from: S. C. (wife) [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], (Americus, Ga), to: F. M. C[oker], June 15, 1863. Col. Speer can get a substitute for him. She worried constantly about his health. She will not go to commencement although Mrs. Collier is there for the occasion. -- Letter from: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], Americus, Ga., to: F. M. C[oker], June 16, 1863. She is glad his health is better but worries about the exposure. Maybe there will soon be news of transfer. The baby's eyes are still crossed since her illness. Crops are looking well and promising. -- Letter from: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], Americus, Ga., to: F. M. C[oker], June 19, 1863. No news--Commencement over. Some friends have married. Finger still sore. Does he need clothes? Everybody well. -- Letter from: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], Americus, Ga., to: F. M. C[oker], June 21, 1863. So glad his health is better. Worries about the Army's moving and not being able to hear from him. She wants to come see him if the Army gets settled again. Crops look good. -- Letter from: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], Americus, Ga., to: F. M. C[oker], June 23, 1863. She gathers from his letter he is going to Maryland and Pennsylvania and she dreads that because she won't hear from him for a while. She prays for him constantly and worries about his health. Wheat is $5 a bushel. -- Letter from: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], Americus, Ga., to: F. M. C[oker], June 26, 1863. She heard, via Col Cutts, that maybe F. M. C. had been transferred to Georgia. She and two friends went bathing in Woodson's pool. So nice!. Letter from: D. Collier, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 29, 1863. A "bread and butter" letter. Mrs. Collier had been there for Commencement. -- Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], 1863. Accounts, R. R. Rees, Sumter Artillery Battn.

America's Turning Point: Documenting the Civil War Experience in Georgia received support from a Digitizing Historical Records grant awarded to the Atlanta History Center, Georgia Historical Society, Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, and the Digital Library of Georgia by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission.

Subjects: Coker, Sarah Alice Reid | Confederate States of America. Army | Fredericksburg, Battle of, Fredericksburg, Va., 1862 | Georgia--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Campaigns | Petersburg Crater, Battle of, Va., 1864 | Richmond (Va.) | Seven Days' Battles, Va., 1862 | Sherman's March to the Sea | Soldiers--Georgia | United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Officers | United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Participation, Foreign | United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865 | Virginia--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Campaigns
Contributors: Hargrett Library
Online Publisher: [Athens, Ga.] : Digital Library of Georgia in association with the Hargrett Library, 2012
Original Material: Box 1 Folder 5, Frances Marion Coker papers. MS 15. Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries.
Rights and Usage: Cite as: Frances Marion Coker papers. MS 15. Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries.
Persistent Link to Item: http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/harg/turningpoint/id:harg0015-001-005

Related Institutions: Digital Library of Georgia
Georgia Historical Society
Atlanta History Center
Hargrett Library
Collection Information: America's Turning Point: Documenting the Civil War Experience in Georgia